Scientific Advisory Board

Critical peer review to help plan and optimize our work

Kirsten Beyer, M.D., is a Professor in the Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology at University Hospital Charité in Berlin. Her research experience spans the spectrum of pediatric allergy, with a focus on food allergy. Her interests include food allergy prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Currently, her group is studying the induction of oral tolerance through oral immunotherapy in food-allergic children and the primary prevention of hen’s egg allergy through early hen’s egg feeding, among other studies.
She is also part of the EU-funded food allergy project EuroPrevall, studying a European birth cohort of more than 12,000 babies, which will be re-evaluated at school age within the EU-funded project iFAAM. Dr. Beyer qualified as an M.D. at the Free University in Berlin, Germany, and carried out her pediatric training and fellowship at the Humboldt University in Berlin. She was also a visiting scientist at Johns Hopkins University and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
A. Wesley Burks, M.D., is Executive Dean for the University of North Carolina School of Medicine as well as the Curnen Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Burks heads a research team whose work centers on the molecular identification of the allergens in specific foods, a better understanding of the mechanism of adverse food reactions, and the development of treatment for food allergy in pre-clinical and clinical studies. He and his colleagues have several ongoing clinical studies with different types of mucosal immunotherapy. Dr. Burks is also a principal investigator for the Consortium of Food Allergy Research (CoFAR), which was established in
July 2005 by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to conduct both observational and clinical studies to answer questions related to food allergies. Dr. Burks earned his medical degree at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, then completed a pediatric residency at the Arkansas Children’s Hospital and a fellowship in allergy and immunology at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Burks is a past Chair and member of the NIH Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune, and Immune-mediated Diseases study section and is Past President of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, where he served from 2012 to 2013.
Thomas B. Casale, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the College of Medicine at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida. Dr. Casale’s clinical and basic research interests are directed toward determination and treatment of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in asthma and allergic diseases. He is currently the director of clinical and translational research and is actively involved in examining immunomodulators for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. 
He is also very active in the development of educational programs in allergy and immunology for local, national and international meetings. Dr. Casale earned his medical degree from the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, Chicago Medical School, then completed his residency at Baylor College of Medicine and an allergy/immunology fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. He served as President of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology from 2007 to 2008.
Jonathan Hourihane, M.D., is a Professor of Paediatrics and Child Health at University College Cork in Ireland. His research interests focus on the exploration of the link between skin barrier dysfunction and systemic allergic disorders, threshold doses of food allergens, immunomodulation of established allergic responses, prevention of allergic sensitization, and evaluation of quality of life in food allergic children. He is co-principal investigator for the BASELINE birth cohort study, which is tracking more than 2,000 Irish children from soon after conception over several years to study the effects of intrauterine growth
restriction, the incidence and prevalence of food allergy and eczema in early childhood, and the incidence and effects of maternal and infant vitamin D status on growth and health. He was Founding Secretary of the Irish Association of Allergy and Immunology and is Founding Chairman of the Irish Food Allergy Network. Dr. Hourihane earned his Bachelor of Medicine (M.B.), Bachelor of Surgery (B.Ch.), and Bachelor of Obstetrics (B.A.O.) degrees at Dublin University, Trinity College and an M.D. from the University of Southampton.
Stacie M. Jones, M.D., is a Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of Allergy and Immunology at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Arkansas Children’s Hospital. She is also a researcher at the Arkansas Children’s Research Institute. Her research focuses on both clinical and translational investigation of food allergy and eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, as well as on asthma and lung disease. Dr. Jones is also a principal investigator for the Consortium of Food Allergy Research (CoFAR), which was established
in July 2005 by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to conduct both observational and clinical studies to answer questions related to food allergies. Dr. Jones earned her medical degree at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and completed her pediatrics residency there and at Arkansas Children’s Hospital, followed by a fellowship in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at Johns Hopkins Hospital.